R&D (Diane Rosenblum & Joe Doyle)

Loading...
R&D (Diane Rosenblum & Joe Doyle)

Diane Rosenblum and the late Joe Doyle, as R&D, extended the bounds of abstract painting, using computer-based manipulation to push, pull and warp the picture plane. R&D paintings make viewers want to reach out and touch the canvas to see if what their eyes tell them is real. These colorful paintings are a new development in abstraction, bringing the illusionary world of computer-derived space to hard-edge painting. R&D artworks intrigue and delight people with their stripes that buldge, ripple, and twist subtly encourage new ways of thinking and being. Collaborations among visual artists are rare, especially between a man and a woman a generation apart.  Joe Doyle was the leading West Coast painter of the Abstract Illusionist movement.  Diane Rosenblum came of age as digital technology was integrating into the classroom, and she was in the first generation to play computer games as a child and learn programming in high school.  

R&D came about when after 30 years as a painter, Joe Doyle began experimenting with large format inkjet printing in combination with 3D modeling software. Diane Rosenblum saw Joe’s progress and got excited about this new work. The collaborative work of R&D, less than 10 years old, is dynamic, bold and vibrant, and has been exhibited throughout the Bay, Brooklyn, and at a solo exhibition at St Mary’s College Museum of Art.


In the last year Diane Rosenblum has shown in Brooklyn, Berlin, London, Sun Valley, Aspen, and San Francisco, and now has an exhibit at St. Mary’s College Art Museum.  She was recently an artist in residence at Takt Kunstprojectraum in Berlin and at the Centre for Substructured Loss in London.  Her work is in twenty museum collections including SFMOMA, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the Cleveland Museum of Art.  She was born in San Francisco and recently moved to her home and studio to San Rafael.

The late Joe Doyle was established as a painter during the movement toward new abstraction in San Francisco in the mid-seventies. Stylistically his work evolved from photo-realist renderings of aircraft which exaggerated differences in focus of background and foreground. By 1975 his imagery shifted to arrangements of flat, geometric forms and tubular squiggles in a trompe l'oeil manner that created the illusion of a multi-layered, three-dimensional space. Doyle and others were included in 'Reality of Illusion' a large touring exhibition of primarily American illusionist artists organized by the University of Southern California and The Denver Art Museum. Doyle was an instructor and co-chair of the Digital Arts Department at Berkeley City College until his passing in 2020.

Read More

FIND US

473 25th Street
Suite A
Oakland, CA 94612

SUBSCRIBE

473 25th Street
Suite A
Oakland, CA 94612
Copyright © 2022, Art Gallery Websites by ArtCloudCopyright © 2022, Art Gallery Websites by ArtCloud